John is an executive recruiter & speaker sharing his thoughts on healthcare, recruiting, digital technology, career management & leadership. 

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Michael Lewis: Boomerang: Travels in the New Third WorldMichael Lewis: Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World Next up on my reading list. Lewis, author of Liar's Poker, The Big Short and Money B
7 November, 2011 Posted by John G. Self
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23 January, 2015 Posted by John G. Self Posted in Healthcare
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Three Important Words

Posted January 23rd, 2015 | Author: John G. Self

Three Important WordsOver the years, I have looked at a lot of hospital ads, reviewed loads of brochures and newsletters, and read more than my share of annual/community supports. There are three words that are usually omitted from these materials.

  • Trust
  • Accountability
  • Guarantee

While it is true that in the inexact science that is the art of patient diagnosis and care, there can be no absolute guarantees of full recovery, I have always wondered why, in our promotional materials, that we have not asked our patients, their families and the communities we serve, to trust us to do the right thing. I understand that there is such a thing as medical malpractice litigation, but that does not mean we cannot, or should not, be accountable for doing the best we can, each day, every day.

In the new world of healthcare, where health systems and hospitals will be competing for the right to manage their well care under a still-to-be-defined concept called population health management, I believe those words will take on a new importance.

After all, we really are asking our communities – our neighbors and friends — to trust us, right?

© 2015 John Gregory Self

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21 January, 2015 Posted by John G. Self Posted in Career Management
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ASK THE RECRUITER: Resume Length

Posted January 21st, 2015 | Author: John G. Self

What is the ideal length of a resume?  I have had several so-called experts who say it should never be more than two pages. What is your opinion?

ASK THE RECRUITER: Resume LengthThere are no hard and fast rules on length with these two exceptions:

  1. If you are new graduate with limited work experience, your resume should not exceed one page, including academic and social accomplishments during your academic career
  2. The length should be proportional in length to years of service and relevant quantifiable accomplishments

I have received resumes from some executives — people with 20 to 30 years of experience with an array of professional accomplishments — that were crammed into two pages.  This necessitated using 10 point type with minimal spacing.  In other words, the resume was all but unreadable!

Is this the first impression you want to make to a potential employer?  I didn’t know whether to crawl up on my desk with a magnifying glass or set up a telescope across the room.

You cannot cram 30 years of good work into two pages and still have an acceptable resume.  Most recruiters I know agree.

When you describe your previous employers, explain your scope of responsibility and list four or five relevant accomplishments for each position — the evidence of your potential value — you will be well into 2.5 to 3 pages at a minimum.

© 2015 John Gregory Self

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16 January, 2015 Posted by Nancy Swain Posted in Leadership
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How Do Other People Experience Your Leadership Style?

Posted January 16th, 2015 | Author: Nancy Swain
how do other people experience your leadership behavior

Source: nothingknew.org

Cognitive dissonance is a term we use in psychology. It is the difference between how we see ourselves and how we actually are. In other words, it is the difference between our self-image and the reality of how others see us. To be an effective leader, the way you perceive yourself and how your people perceive you should be in sync.

Are you aware of your assets and liabilities as a leader? A really good leader should be aware of the impact they have on others. Do you as a leader ask others what they think of how you operate? Are you willing to even get feedback from those you lead?

As you start the New Year in a leadership role, below are some areas for feedback that may take a dose of honesty and courage to examine, but well worth the effort. If you didn’t know, people are already aware of your assets and liabilities or strengths and shortcomings as a leader. The question is: Are you? Why should you lead anyone?

Below are 20 questions to help understand your leadership assets and potential liabilities.

  1. Do I make the tough decisions that need to be made and do so with respect for others?
  2. Are my decisions made in a timely manner?
  3. Do I listen to people’s opinions and take action because of them or explain why I would not use them?
  4. Do other people trust me? Can you list them?
  5. Do I trust other people? Who and why?
  6. Do I resolve nonperformance issues on my team?
  7. Am I sensitive to the needs of others?
  8. Is my communication clear and concise?
  9. Am I open to new ideas of doing things?
  10. Do I treat people equally or show favoritism?
  11. Am I aware of the impact my behavior has on others?
  12. Do I create engagement? Do people want to follow me?
  13. Do I show people how to learn and develop?
  14. Am I seen as honest and ethical?
  15. Do I encourage people to be candid? Am I approachable?
  16. Do I believe my people are the greatest asset?
  17. Do I invest in my people?
  18. Do I resolve conflict when it arises?
  19. How do others show me I am respected?
  20. How do I show others they are respected?

 

rp_NancyHeadshot.jpgNancy Swain is a member of the JohnGSelf + Partners transition coaching team, leading the Transition/Outplacement practice and advising clients on candidate profiles. She is also President of Strategic Intelligence in Dallas.  You can reach Nancy at Nancy@johngself.com.

© 2015 John Gregory Self

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