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27 June, 2012 Posted by John G. Self Posted in Career Management
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A Note to Those Who Have Gotten the Sack

If you are beginning a career transition – the timing of which was not of your choosing — there are three things to consider.

Turmoil will produce turnover.  Healthcare is about to enter a period of prolonged transformational change.  Some might argue that what we will experience is outright turmoil, but the fact is there will be other executives just like you forced to make a job or career change.  You are not alone.

Take some time to decompress.  If you were not provided a reasonable severance plan, “taking time” to take a step back may seem unrealistic.  Feeling a compelling sense of urgency is natural, but so is the emotion of grief that affects many of us when we get the sack.  If you are sad and angry, do NOT rush off to interview for a new job.  You may not think your emotional state is showing, but based on my more than 18 years of recruiting experience, I can tell you that it is.

Rand Stagen’s concept of gamefilming in Next Level Leadership really applies when you lose your job, especially if it is related to performance or a cultural disconnect.  Gamefilming is the process of replaying the mental video of your performance – like coaches grading filmed performances of their athletes – and thinking about your successes, your failures and your attitude.  Taking some time to relook at your performance from a different angle can be enlightening.

This is a good time to challenge yourself – are you really doing what you are passionate about or, are or you experiencing a career progression by default – you are in your current job because that is what you have always done.

Get organized. Finding a job will be your new full-time job.  Organization and planning are critical elements in executing a successful search.  Be sure your resume template is defect free.  Buy a logbook or journal to record your contacts and follow up requirements.  Analyze your LinkedIn network to find out who knows who – connect the dots.  Who might be able to help you target that perfect opportunity?  You are more likely to find the job you want using this method than by relying on a search consultant.

Many great healthcare leaders I know have gotten the sack.  It is not the end of the world.  This period of transition can be a game changing time in your life.

© 2014 John Gregory Self

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